Refugee crisis: latest news from across Europe 11.8.16


 Migrant children are living on their own in the streets of Sicily after risking their lives in the Mediterranean

 

The story of a group of at least 15 children, most of whom are Eritrean, struggling to survive in the station in Catania as they attempt to put together the 38 euros they need to travel to Rome, sometimes by washing cars as they hope to reach northern Europe. A recent UN report claims that Eritrea "systematically commits crimes against humanity".

 The migrant camps of Chios: Greece's ongoing refugee crisis (open democracy, link):

"There are three refugee camps on the Greek island of Chios. Your quality of life depends a great deal on where you've been placed, and where you’ve been placed is mostly down to luck."

 Greece considers migration ’emergency plan’ (euractiv, link):

"Athens is making “immediate and short-term” plans to cope with a possible increase of refugee flows, Greek media reported.Greek prime minister Alexis Tsipras will interrupt his short vacation and hold next weekend meetings with ministers on the issue....

Tsipras is expected to warn EU leaders that Athens will not be able to cope with a large increase in refugee flows from Turkey as a result of the internal situation after the failed coup attempt."

 EU envoy to sound out Ankara on migrant deal (ekathimerini.com, link):

"Following a barrage of statements by Turkish government officials effectively threatening to break a pact struck between the European Union and Ankara to curb migrant smuggling across the Aegean, European Commissioner for Migration Dimitris Avramopoulos is planning a visit to Ankara in the first 10 days of September to gauge sentiment and determine whether the crucial deal remains on track, Kathimerini understands.

 Unaccompanied foreign minors between dispersal and criminalisation (by Fulvio Vassallo Paleologo, 20.5.2016)

This article notes that the media are increasingly reporting cases of unaccompanied foreign minors who are disappearing in Italy, linked to alarming phenomena including people trafficking, the trade in organs and exploitation. While traffickers exist and the trade organs does not appear to be especially relevant at the moment, the author argues that other important issues are not being spoken about or reported.

 

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