National Security and Open Government: Striking the right balance


"The terror attacks of September 11, 2001 have compelled a reappraisal of the balance that should be struck between the interests served by governmental openness, and the need to protect national security -- in the United States, and many other countries as well.

The commentaries in this book describe how governments around the world have reconciled calls for openness and concern for the preservation of national security, and propose new ways of thinking about the tension between these two important interests.

The commentaries were written for a symposium on National Security and Open Government held in Washington, DC in May 2003. The symposium was a joint project of the Campbell Public Affairs Institute and the Open Society Justice Initiative."

Source: http://open.campbellinstitute.org

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Preface/Contributors

1. National Security vs. Openness: An Overview and Status Report on the Johannesburg Principles by Toby Mendel

2. National Security and Open Government in the United States: Beyond the Balancing Test by Thomas S. Blanton

3. National Security and Open Government in the United Kingdom by John Wadham and Kavita Modi

4. Digital Government in the European Union: Freedom of Information Trumped by “Internal Security” by Deirdre Curtin

5. National Security and the Right to Information in Bulgaria by Alexander Kashumov

6. Nato’s Security of Information Policy and the Right to Information by Alasdair Roberts

7. Access to Information and National Security in Chile by Felipe González

8. Access to Information and National Security in South Africa by Jonathan Klaaren

9. National Security and Open Government in Indonesia by Bimo Nugroho


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