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EU Internal Security Strategy


This Observatory contains:

- Latest developments
- Council of the European Union
- European Commission
- European Parliament
- European Data Protection Supervisor
- UK parliament
- UK Government
- Civil society
- Background


Latest developments

Council of the European Union: Draft Report to the European Parliament and national Parliaments on the proceedings of the Standing Committee on operational cooperation on internal security for the period January 2010 - June 2011 (pdf)

UK House of Lords Select Committee on the European Union: The EU Internal Security Strategy (90 pages, pdf): The Committee observes on the Standing Committee on Internal Security (COSI): "There should be greater openness about COSI’s activities so that it does not appear to be secretive and lacking in transparency. We have recommended that inter-parliamentary oversight of the work of Europol could be by bi-annual meetings of the Chairmen of the home affairs committees of national parliaments and the LIBE Committee of the European Parliament. We believe that such meetings could also consider the work of COSI."

Council conclusions on the Commission communication on the European Union internal security strategy in action (pdf). See: European Parliament: Internal Security: Working Document no 2 (pdf). Rapporteur: Rita Borsellino MEP: "The disregard shown to date by the Commission and Council for the role of the European Parliament and national parliaments in drawing up this strategy is unquestionably a cause for concern.... In order to meet its responsibilities in this respect, it is essential for Parliament to have all the information necessary for it to fulfil its role as co-legislator" This situation stems from Article 71 of the Lisbon Treaty which, in relation of the Standing Committee on Internal Security (COSI), says: "The European Parliament and national Parliaments shall be kept informed of the proceedings." Under the Lisbon Treaty COSI is not accountable to European and national parliaments - historically, the term "kept informed" has been interpreted by the Council to mean the bare minimum (an annual report).

European Parliament: Working document no 1 (pdf) Working Document no 2 (pdf). Rapporteur: Rita Borsellino MEP

EU: INTERNAL SECURITY STRATEGY: UK House of Lords European Committee inquiry: The EU Internal Security Strategy Written Evidence (pdf)

EU: European Data Protection Supervisor (EDPS): EU Internal Security Strategy: "Security and privacy concerns should be equally taken serious" says EDPS (Press release, pdf) and Opinion (pdf): "Peter Hustinx, EDPS, says: "Internal security is an area where there are clear risks of intrusions into the citizens' privacy. This is why security and privacy concerns should be equally taken serious. I am convinced that an effective Internal Security Strategy can not be put in place without the support of a solid data protection scheme complementing it. In other words: no zero sums of privacy and security, we need them both!"


Council of the European Union

Council of the European Union:
Draft Report to the European Parliament and national Parliaments on the proceedings of the Standing Committee on operational cooperation on internal security for the period January 2010 - June 2011 (pdf)

- Next steps in enhancing cooperation between the external and internal aspects of EU security (pdf)

- Internal Security Strategy for the European Union: "Towards a European Security Model"

Informal Justice and Home Affairs Council: Internal Security: Organised crime (pdf)


European Commission

European Commission: Internal Security Strategy: Press release (pdf) and The EU Internal Security Strategy in Action: Five steps towards a more secure Europe (COM 673, pdf)


European Parliament

- Working document no 1 (pdf) Working Document no 2 (pdf). Rapporteur: Rita Borsellino MEP


European Data Protection Supervisor

EU: European Data Protection Supervisor (EDPS): EU Internal Security Strategy: "Security and privacy concerns should be equally taken serious" says EDPS (Press release, pdf) and Opinion (pdf): "Peter Hustinx, EDPS, says: "Internal security is an area where there are clear risks of intrusions into the citizens' privacy. This is why security and privacy concerns should be equally taken serious. I am convinced that an effective Internal Security Strategy can not be put in place without the support of a solid data protection scheme complementing it. In other words: no zero sums of privacy and security, we need them both!"

EU: INTERNAL SECURITY STRATEGY: European Data Protection Supervisor (EDPS): EU Counter-Terrorism policy: EDPS calls for a systematic and consistent approach to avoid unnecessary restrictions to privacy (Press release, pdf) and Opinion (pdf)


UK House of Lords inquiry

- EU: Internal Security Strategy: UK House of Lords European Committee inquiry: The EU Internal Security Strategy Written Evidence (pdf)

- Sir Ian Andrews, [Chairman, Serious Organised Crime Agency], and Mark Bishop, [Head of Strategy, Co-ordination and Development, International Department, SOCA].

-
Dr Paul Cornish, [Carrington Professor of International Security, Chatham House].

Corrected Oral Evidence (links):

- Rob Wainwright, Director, Europol and Brian Donald, Head of the office of the Director of Europol

-
David O'Sullivan, Director General for External Relations at the Commission; Erik Windmar, Member of Commissioner Malmström's Cabinet; Lars-Gunnar Wigemark, Head of Security Policy, DG External Relations; Stéphane Chardon, Administrator, DG External Relations

-
William Shapcott, former director of the Council Joint Situation Centre (SitCen)

- Cecilia Malmström, Commissioner for Home Affairs, European Commission

House of Commons

- European Scrutiny Select Committee: Implementing the EU’s Internal Security Strategy (pdf)


UK Government

- Explanatory Memorandum on ISS, November 2010



Civil society

Statewatch Analysis: First thoughts on the EU’s Internal Security Strategy (pdf )

EU Internal Security strategy: towards a EU-USA common path? (ESFJ, link)

Towards an Internal (In)security Strategy for the EU? (CEPS, link)



Background

The Internal Security in the Stockholm Programme: (EU doc no: 17024/09)

"A Europe that protects: An internal security strategy should be developed in order to further improve security in the Union and thus protect the lives and safety of European citizens and tackle organised crime, terrorism and other threats. The strategy should be aimed at strengthening cooperation in law enforcement, border management, civil protection, disaster management as well as criminal judicial cooperation in order to make Europe more secure. Moreover, the European Union needs to base its work on solidarity between Member States and make full use of Article 222 TFEU." and

"4.1 Internal Security Strategy

The European Council is convinced that the enhancement of actions at European level, combined with better coordination with actions at regional and national levels, are essential to protection from trans-national threats. Terrorism and organised crime, drug trafficking, corruption, trafficking in human beings, smuggling of persons and trafficking in arms, among others, continue to challenge the internal security of the EU. Cross-border widespread crime has become an urgent challenge which requires a clear and comprehensive response. Action of the Union will enhance the work carried out by Member States’ competent authorities and improve the outcome of their work.

The European Council calls upon the Council and the Commission to

- define a comprehensive EU internal security strategy based, in particular, on the following principles:
- clarity on the division of tasks between the EU and the Member States, reflecting a shared vision of today's challenges,
- respect for fundamental rights, international protection and the rule of law,
- solidarity between Member States,
- reflection of a proactive and intelligence-led approach,
- the need for a horizontal and cross-cutting approach in order to be able to deal with complex crises or natural or man-made disasters,
- stringent cooperation between EU agencies, including further improving their information exchange,
- a focus on implementation and streamlining as well as the improvement of preventive action,
- the use of regional initiatives and regional cooperation,
- the aim of making citizens aware of the importance of the Union’s work to protect them.

Developing, monitoring and implementing the internal security strategy should become one of the priority tasks of the Internal Security Committee (COSI) set up under Article 71 TFEU. In order to ensure the effective enforcement of the internal security strategy, it shall also cover security aspects of an integrated border management and, where appropriate, judicial cooperation in criminal matters relevant to operational cooperation in the field of internal security.

The internal security strategy should also take into account the external security strategy developed by the EU as well as other EU policies, in particular those concerning the internal market. Account should also be taken of the impact it may have on relations with the EU's neighbourhood and particularly with the candidate and potential candidate countries, since internal security is
interlinked with the external dimension of the threats. In a global world, crime knows no borders.

As the policies followed in the fields of justice and home affairs gradually reach maturity, they should support each other and grow in consistency. In the years to come they should fit smoothly together with the other policies of the Union.

The European Council asks the Commission

- to consider the feasibility of setting up of an Internal Security Fund to promote the implementation of the Internal Security Strategy so that it becomes an operational reality.

4.2 Upgrading the tools for the job

Security in the EU requires an integrated approach where security professionals share a common
culture, pool information as effectively as possible and have the right technological infrastructure to
support them."



European Commission: Action Plan (COM 171-2010)

"An Internal Security Strategy, based upon the full respect of fundamental rights and on solidarity between Member States, will be implemented with care and firm resolve to face the growing cross-border challenges. It implies a coordinated approach to police cooperation, border management, criminal justice cooperation and civil protection. We need to address all the common threats from terrorism and organised crime, to man-made and natural disasters.

To be successful, this strategy needs to build on experience and lessons learnt. The time has come to assess our past approach, when the Union had to react to unexpected and tragic events, often on a case by case basis, and to capitalise on the new institutional set-up offered by the Lisbon treaty with a coherent and multidisciplinary approach.

The establishment of a strategic agenda for the exchange of information requires an overview of existing data collection, processing and data-sharing systems, with a thorough assessment of their usefulness, efficiency, effectiveness, proportionality and their respect of the right to privacy. It should also lay the ground for a coherent development of all existing and future information systems.

As a priority we need to take stock of the counter-terrorism measures put in place in recent years and assess how they can be improved to contribute to protecting our citizens and add value to Member States' action. The new institutional framework offers the Union an unprecedented opportunity to better interlink its different counter terrorism instruments.

Future measures on organised crime need to use the new institutional framework to the fullest extent possible. Trafficking in human beings, child pornography, cyber crime, financial crime, counterfeiting of means of payment and drugs trafficking, should be tackled in a comprehensive way. More effective prosecution and conviction are as important as attending to the needs of the victims of these crimes and reducing the demand for services from
potential victims. Pooling Member State's law enforcement capabilities on specific drugs and routes will be a first concrete operational answer.

We also need to remove all the obstacles in the way of effective law enforcement cooperation between Member States. EU agencies and bodies such as FRONTEX, Europol and Eurojust, as well as OLAF, have a crucial role to play. They must cooperate better and be given the powers and resources necessary to achieve their goals within clearly defined roles.

The Union will pursue an integrated approach to the control of access to its territory in an enlarged Schengen area, to further facilitate mobility and ensure a high level of internal security. Visa liberalisation will be pursued in particular with neighbouring countries in order to facilitate people-to-people contacts based on clearly defined conditions.

Smart use of modern technologies in border management to complement existing tools as a part of a risk management process can also make Europe more accessible to bona fide travellers and stimulate innovation among EU industries, thus contributing to Europe's prosperity and growth, and ensure the feeling of security of Union's citizens. The coming into operation of the SIS II and VIS systems will continue to be a high priority.

Protecting citizens from the risks posed by international trade in counterfeited, prohibited and dangerous goods also requires a coordinated approach, building on the strength of customs authorities. Protection against harmful and dangerous goods must be ensured in an effective and structured manner through a control-based risk management of goods, of the supply chain and of any type of goods flows.

Our efforts to protect people will include the EU's role in crisis and disaster prevention, preparedness and response. Further assessment and necessary action at EU-level in crisis management will be an immediate priority. The EU Civil Protection Mechanism will be strengthened to improve the availability, interoperability and coordination of Member States' assistance. Prevention also needs to be enhanced. The Union will implement the solidarity clause."


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